Tag Archives: sailing

Survival Weekly – 10/21/15…

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Welcome to another edition of Survival Weekly, where the real wilderness survival “reality show” plays out everyday, in the wild places around our world. These unscripted stories will give you insight to the true threats and challenges you may face i+n your outdoor pursuits. So sit back, relax, and read on to get a dose of reality to sharpen your most valuable survival tool. – BPO

Featured – 

Hikers fall when suspension bridge cable breaks –  http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/09/travel/bridge-collapse-in-new-zealand/

Survival 101 grad finds missing boy. Way to go Sean!! –  http://www.wbir.com/story/news/local/2015/10/20/knoxville-police-searching-missing-child-who-has-autism/74289558/

News – 

China charges rescued hikers – http://english.cri.cn/12394/2015/10/16/4021s899826.htm

Cell phones and Blackhawks – http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/environment/3603321-151/cell-service-black-hawk-key-to-mountain-rescues#

Water Safety –

SAR for missing sailors – http://citizen.co.za/824010/two-sailors-missing-off-eastern-cape-coast/

Search continues for missing boater – http://www.yorkregion.com/news-story/5971958-week-long-search-for-missing-newmarket-boater-continues-on-lake-simcoe/

Hiking – 

Lost & Injured hikers rescued –

Hunter-gatherer – 

Prospector rescued – http://www.mymotherlode.com/news/local/251335/search-and-rescue-recovers-injured-prospector.html

Missing fishermen – https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/major-search-and-rescue-operation-continues-for-missing-fishermen-avid-060a2b340101010501010f1013-000000-cda0f8f4e1df0094-ccb90060dd44-a8b1.html

Duck hunter rescued – http://www.wnem.com/story/30290704/duck-hunter-teenage-son-rescued

Injured hunter rescued – http://www.pagosasun.com/hunter-rescued-in-piedra-area/

Injured hunter rescued after fall – http://www.taosnews.com/news/article_5598a1a8-7778-11e5-a156-6fcd35b1279d.html

Climbing – 

Vehicles – 

 Horse rider rescued –   http://www.durangoherald.com/article/20151018/NEWS01/151019644/-1/news01&source=RSS

Interested in learning skills to handle emergencies like the ones you read in Survival Weekly?  Check out BigPig Outdoors Survival  classes  – http://www.bigpigoutdoors.net/survival-101-1.htm

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image: http://english.cri.cn/12394/2015/10/16/4021s899826.htm
First image: http://www.derbytelegraph.co.uk/Derbyshire-heart-attack-sufferer-completes/story-28007769-detail/story.html

Survival Weekly – 5/12/15…

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Welcome to another edition of Survival Weekly, where the real wilderness survival “reality show” plays out everyday, in the wild places around our world. These unscripted stories will give you insight to the true threats and challenges you may face in your outdoor pursuits. So sit back, relax, and read on to get a dose of reality to sharpen your most valuable survival tool. – BPO

Featured – 

Breastmilk –  not just for babies, but thirsty survivors too!! – https://home.bt.com/news/world-news/lost-runner-drank-breast-milk-to-survive-night-in-new-zealand-wilderness-11363980489533

News – 

Heli-drone – http://www.zawya.com/middle-east/video/VID20150511061259/

Water Safety – 

Recovery of boating accident victims – http://www.myarklamiss.com/story/d/story/search-and-rescue-crews-recover-body-of-missing-bo/87440/jRKm_7gkeEa_S-_TxaQj0A

Stranded boaters rescued – http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/local-news/search-and-rescue-find-stranded-boaters-1.1930916

Sailors rescued from island –  http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/20150416_2_rescued_after_sailboat_runs_aground_on_trip_from_Lanai_to_Tahiti.html?id=300232971

Hiking – 

** For Carol** PCT hiker rescued after water sources dried up – http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015/05/06/drought-hiker-pacific-crest-trail-rescue/26967587/

Lost & Injured hikers rescued –

Hunter-gatherer – 

SAR for mushroom hunter ends http://www.pjstar.com/article/20150511/NEWS/150519907

Climbing – 

Injured climber rescued – http://www.harrogateadvertiser.co.uk/news/local/climber-rescued-after-almscliffe-crag-fall-1-7253665

Vehicles – 

Injured motocross rider rescued in Desert Challenge – http://www.thenational.ae/uae/injured-swedish-motorcyclist-praises-uae-search-and-rescue-team

Small plane crash – http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/international/2015-05-09/pilot-dead-after-light-aircraft-crashes-off-north-stradbroke-island/1445524

Interested in learning skills to handle emergencies like the ones you read in Survival Weekly?  Check out BigPig Outdoors Survival 101 class  – http://www.bigpigoutdoors.net/survival-101-1.htm

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Whistlemania V – Come Sail Away…

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As the final rounds of Whistlemania begin, we start to get into the real tests of performance, those of distance, and this week’s test is for all the water lovers out there.

If you follow Survival Weekly on this blog, you have probably noticed more water rescues and fatalities as the weather warmed up. Common sense dictates that when it gets hot, more of us like to cool of in the water or play on it. Most fatalities are from drowning, so wearing a lifejacket is your best plan and ataching a whistle to said lifejacket may aid in a timely rescue.

Some of you have probably also heard that sounds carries better over water. In addition to the lack of obstacles, cooler air above the surface of the water actually slows the sound wave down causing it to bend, delivering more sound waves to the listener. Here is a quote from an article over on American Boating Association’s page: http://www.americanboating.org/sound.asp

According to Howard Shaw, Ph. D. and Cheryl Jackson Hall, Ph. D., “Experience suggests that sound, like light, travels (more or less) in straight lines. However, to the contrary, sound actually tends to curve downwards over a lake’s surface.”

“Sound traveling along straight lines would disperse quickly into the space above the lake. Instead, sound that “should” rise up and be lost typically curves back down to the lake/ground level. Therefore, it sounds louder than it “should.” This is a well-known and easily demonstrated observation, measurable out there on real lakes.”

Test: Paddle out to known distances and by the process of elimination, determine the maximum ranges for the whistles. Distances were determined by GPS and tests were done at 1/4 mile, 1/2 mile, 3/4 mile, and 1 mile.

The conditions were sunny with a high temp of 87 degrees. Initially, the was a breeze blowing towards the observers, but conditions during the 1/2 mile to 1 mile tests were calm.

Ambient noise from birds, locusts, and waves was present and tests were temporarily stopped to allow for boat traffic to pass. The observers were positioned on the point of a peninsula that extends halfway across Calderwood Lake for their listening post and were asked to comment via radio if the whistle could be heard and if it could be confused with other noises.

Three blasts of each whistle were done at each distance until a couple of kayakers appeared out of nowhere to rescue me. After that, I switched to two blasts and each whistle was given a second chance at the distance it failed.

Below is a picture of the test site with the orange arrow being the observers a mile away. Our lakes in the mountains are narrow and long, so the possibility of sound funneling can be addressed by someone smarter than me in the comment section if you wish.

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The observers: Special thanks goes to Brian and Laura Osgood, Sierra McAllister, and Dr. Ken Miller of the Blount County Rescue Squad. While patrolling Highway 129, a.k.a. The Dragon’s Tail, I managed to catch them in some down time and they were happy to wade into the melee of rescue whistles. These are real world rescuers and this team comprises a good mix of hearing ability. Dr. “Hunk” Miller, age 72, has significant high frequency hearing loss from years of shooting, military service, and women screaming about his good looks.  He was wearing his hearing aids during the test, as he would on an actual incident.

Sierra, age 18, like all young adults may be guilty of cranking up the tunes too loud, but as expected had the keenest ears. Brian and Laura, both in their mid 40’s, represented what we all considered to be the average hearing ability of a responder.

I have had the pleasure to work with the BCRS professionals on several incidents on the Dragon’s Tail and one remote rescue in the park that required the use of their vessel and can’t say enough about their dedication, skill, and professionalism. Every year, BCRS provides nearly 32,000 lifesaving volunteer hours and consistently places in the top three in statewide rescue competitions.

If you or anybody you love rides motorcycles or drives sports cars, these are the men and women that will be saving their lives on the Dragon if the unthinkable occurs. They do all this and more with a volunteer staff and relying solely on donations from the community for their operation!!

BigPig Outdoors would like to thank the Blount County Rescue Squad for their service in the community and their assistance in Whistlemania and has made a $150 donation to their organization as a token of our appreciation and will be teaching a free survival course for their staff this winter.

If you, your family, or organization have found the information from Whistlemania valuable, I urge you to click on the link below and contribute any amount to their cause. Even if you can only donate the price of an average whistle, it all helps.

Make a Donation Button

Donations may also be mailed to:

Blount County Rescue Squad
P.O. Box 218
Alcoa, TN 37701

http://www.bcrs.org/

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The battle for the open water champion begins…

Well almost… Starting at 1/4 mile Doc Miller could not hear a majority of the whistles. To save typing, assume that Doc Miller didn’t hear any of them unless noted and that includes the 1/4 mile tests.

“Heard up to” – Means that all three observers without hearing damage could hear it at that distance, unless noted differently.

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Jetscream Micro – Heard up to 1/2 mile. Failed at 3/4 mile.

ACME 660 – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

Fox 40 Classic – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

ACME Tornado 635 –  Heard up to 3/4 mile. Observers commented that it could be confused with a car horn. Failed at 1 mile.

Hammerhead – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Observers commented that sound was faint. Failed at 1 mile.

Tin Whistle –  Heard up to 3/4 mile. Observers commented that sound was faint and bird like. Failed at 1 mile.

Fox 40 Mini – Heard up to 3/4 mile by 2 out of 3 observers. Failed at 1 mile.

AMK or SOL or Fox 40 Micro –  Heard up to 1/2 mile. Failed at 3/4 mile.

ACME Tornado 636 –  Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

SOL Slim Rescue Howler –  Heard up to 3/4 mile. Observers commented could be confused with bird. Failed at 1 mile.

ACR – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

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Coghlan’s 5 in 1 Survival Aid – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

Zipper Pull Whistle – Heard up to 1/2 mile. Reported as faint. Failed at 3/4 mile.

Coghlan’s 4 in 1 Whistle – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Reported as bird-like. Failed at 1 mile.

Sternum Strap Whistle – Heard up to 1/2 mile. Reported as faint. Heard by 2 out of 3 at 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

LMF Swedish Firesteel Army 2.0 –  Heard up to 1/2 mile. Reported as faint and bird-like. Failed at 3/4 mile.

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Windstorm – Heard up to a mile. Rated as a 2 out of 3 on loudness at that distance. On several blows, the pea got temporarily stuck and required another blow to free up.

Hammerhead Mighty – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

Lifejacket Whistle – Heard up to 3/4 mile including Doc Miller!! Heard at 1 mile by all except Doc. Rated at 1 mile as 2 out of 3 for loudness.

FOX 40 Eclipse – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

Storm – Heard up to 1 mile. Rated a 3 out of 3 for loudness. Doc Miller heard this one at 1/2 mile, but no further. On several blows, the pea got temporarily stuck and required another blow to free up.

Scotty Lifesaver – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Reported as faint. Failed at 1 mile.

ACME Tornado 2000 – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

FOX 40 Sonic Blast – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

UST Jetscream – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

Whistles for Life – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

Promo whistle – Heard up to 3/4 mile by 2 out 3 observers. Reported that it sounded cow-like. Failed at 1 mile.

FOX 40 Sharx – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile. Doc Miller heard this one at 1/4 mile, but no further.

ACME Cyclone 888 – Heard up to 3/4 mile. Failed at 1 mile.

ACME 649 – Heard up to 3/4 mile, including Doc Miller. Reported as being bird or horn like. Failed at 1 mile.

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BigPig’s Canoe Paddling, Sunburned Head, Whistle Blowing Observations:

  1. I have done some unsanctioned testing during classes in the woods and the difference between open water and the woods is surprising.
  2. At a distance of 1 mile, all observers could hear me yell and stated it was louder than the whistle. My voice would have gone out if done repeatedly, but an occasional yell along with whistling is a good plan.
  3. The average age of rangers in the Smokies and BCRS volunteers is in the mid-30’s. High frequency hearing loss often accompanies aging. Consideration needs to be given to the fact that a lot of our young veterans return with hearing damage and many serve among the ranks in Search and Rescue organizations.
  4. Both low frequency whistles, the Lifejacket and the ACME 649, were heard by Doc Miller up to 3/4 mile away. As stated earlier, even with the use of his hearing aids, he could not hear the other whistles with the exception of the Sharx at 1/4 mile and the Storm up to 1/2 mile.
  5. Our testing day would represent ideal conditions. Wind and waves would surely decrease the observed distances.
  6. I underestimated the Lifejacket whistle. It is old and ultra cheap, but gave a great showing.
  7. Don’t carry the Promo whistle if you plan on getting lost in dairy country…

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Stay tuned as Whistlemania continues when we move back onto the land and head into the woods for the distance test…

Catch up with previous rounds:

“Gamemaker” Gabby prepares the contestants…

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Whistlemania III – Slippery When Wet…

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 If you are a boater, raft guide, lifeguard, sailor, swift water rescuer, or anyone that works around water, this episode is for you. I guess since 70 percent of the earth is covered by water, then this episode is really for everyone.

So crank up the Bon Jovi as our our gladiators hit the lake to find out which liked to wet their whistles and which ones needed water wings…

Test 1:  I pulled out my life jacket from my old raft guiding days, strapped it on, and went into the drink. The test was simple. Completely submerge and then see how many blasts it took to clear the whistle of water when I popped up.

Test 2: Some manufacturers boast that their whistle floats. I think this is a non issue, since it should be attached to your lifejacket by a lanyard. I tested them anyway.

Test 3: Some manufacturers claim their whistles work underwater.

According to http://www.stormwhistles.com/ “It’s patented design allows the Storm whistle to be heard up to fifty feet underwater, due to its unique sounding chamber forcing out all water when the whistle is blown.” 

I assume this is just boasting about the easy clearance as I am not aware of any practical value of underwater whistle blowing. Anyway, I went under and tried them out.

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How did they do? Scroll on down to find your pick..

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Jetscream Micro – 2 blasts to clear, floated, worked underwater

ACME 660 – 2 blasts to clear, floated, worked under water

Fox 40 Classic – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

ACME Tornado 635 –  2 blasts to clear, floated, did not work underwater

Hammerhead – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

Tin Whistle –  2 blasts to clear, sinker, did not work underwater

Fox 40 Mini – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

AMK or SOL or Fox 40 Micro –  2 blasts to clear, floated, worked underwater

ACME Tornado 636 –  2 blasts to clear, floated, worked underwater

SOL Slim Rescue Howler –  2 blasts to clear, floated, worked underwater

ACR – 3 blasts to clear, floated, worked underwater

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Coghlan’s 5 in 1 Survival Aid – 3 blasts to clear, floated, did not work underwater

Zipper Pull Whistle – 4 blasts to clear, sinker, did not work underwater

Coghlan’s 4 in 1 Whistle – 2 blasts to clear, sinker, did not work underwater

Sternum Strap Whistle – 2 blasts to clear, sinker, worked underwater

LMF Swedish Firesteel Army 2.0 –  4 blasts to clear, sinker, worked underwater

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Windstorm – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

Hammerhead Mighty – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

Lifejacket Whistle – 3 blasts to clear, floated, worked underwater

FOX 40 Eclipse – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

Storm – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

Scotty Lifesaver – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

ACME Tornado 2000 – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

FOX 40 Sonic Blast – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

UST Jetscream – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

Whistles for Life – 2 blasts to clear, floated, worked underwater

Promo whistle –  2 blasts to clear, floated, worked underwater

FOX 40 Sharx – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

ACME Cyclone 888 – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

ACME 649 – 1 blast to clear, floated, worked under water

Test 1 Observations:

  • 1st blasters – Easy. The pealess, like the Fox series, seemed a little easier than versions with a pea
  • 2nd blasters – It wasn’t too hard to clear them. I wouldn’t discount a 2nd blaster
  • 3rd blasters – I found it funny that the “Lifejacket” whistle ended up here
  • 4th blasters – Both are multi-purpose and not likely to be your water rescue whistle

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Test 2 Observations: 

  • Shame on you if your whistle is not tethered or clipped to your jacket as it could be dropped, swept away by the current, or waves.
  • Realistically, the sternum strap, zipper pull, and ferro rod striker are attached to something that may float or may sink

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Test 3 Observations:

  • Both the Storm and the Windstorm did seem to perform best underwater. If you have gills then maybe these are the whistles for you.

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Tune in next week to see how your pick fares..

If you are late to the party and need to catch up, click the following links;

Whistlemania I – https://bigpigblog.com/2014/05/05/whistlemania-i/

Whistlemania II – https://bigpigblog.com/2014/05/15/whistlemania-ii-the-iceman-cometh/